Google Gives $1 Million for Justice and Shines Light on Dark History of Lynching

The search engine titan has a history of donating to causes that promote social justice. In February, Google provided provide $11.5 million in new funding to 10 racial justice organizations including the Center for Policing Equity, Impact Justice, and Center for Employment Opportunities—one of several groups funded that work on supplying the previously incarcerated with marketable job skills… Read more here.

Identity Traps: How to think about Race & Policing

Since the summer of 2014, Americans have seen more videos of violent interactions between police and non-Whites than ever before. While the interpretation of some specific incidents remains contentious and data on police use of force are scant, there is evidence that racial disparities in policing exist even when considering racial disparities in crime. The traditional civil rights model of institutional reform assumes that racial bigotry is the primary cause of these disparities; it attempts to address problems through adversarial litigation, protest, and education. Read more

Speakers bring message of racial inclusion to Summit in Muskegon

[CPE Cofounder and President Dr. Phillip Atiba] Goff said he works with institutions of power to help translate the institutions’ values into behaviors to create mechanisms of metrics of accountability for the institutions to police the communities that are most vulnerable.

“By doing this, we are able to engage the communities that have traditionally thought of law enforcement as their adversaries,” Goff said. “We build processes that communities can trust when they can’t trust each other.”  Read more here.

Latinos In Three Cities Are Reporting Fewer Crimes Since Trump Took Office

There is historical precedent for immigration policies’ affecting reporting among undocumented immigrants. Salt Lake City encountered similar issues when the state legislature debated a bill that would require local law enforcement to detain unauthorized immigrants, recalled Chris Burbank, the [director or law enforcement engagement at the Center for Policing Equity and] police chief at the time. “What we found was, not surprisingly, undocumented individuals would be less likely to report crimes,” he said in an interview. “We had children go missing … but their parents wouldn’t call the police. We heard about them from neighbors.”  Read more here.

Center for Policing Equity Releases Statement on Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ Order of Maximum Charges for Drug Offenses

NEW YORK, NY — The Center for Policing Equity released the following statement in response to Attorney General Sessions’ order for federal prosecutors to seek maximum charges for drug offenses:

“Attorney General Sessions’ latest order is a sad confirmation of his intention to erode the progress civil rights organizations have made to advance criminal justice reform over the past several years.

“His across-the-board mandate to federal prosecutors to seek the maximum punishment for drug offenses will undoubtedly have disproportionately negative consequences on the most vulnerable communities—the communities that most need our help. It is an affront to justice, a wound to public safety, and a stunning retreat from the wisdom that science and police executives have accumulated together.”

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The 5 Scariest Things About Jeff Sessions’s New War on Drugs

Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff on Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ Drug Charges Memo: “…Here’s why this matters in terms of Sessions’ order today: In an environment where you are likely to suffer brutal consequences for charging someone too lightly—and there’s really no way to suffer negative political consequences for charging someone too tough—having a federal environment that says you should be going harder rather than softer on crime might further incentivize folks to be afraid to charge too light. And that’s exactly the wrong signal to be making.” Read more here.