Google.org Announces $5 Million Grant To Advance CPE’S National Justice Database

Media Contact:
Natalie Stuppard
Natalie@policingequity.org

GOOGLE.ORG ANNOUNCES $5 MILLION GRANT TO ADVANCE CPE’S NATIONAL JUSTICE DATABASE

Award makes CPE the largest grantee in Google.org‘s latest racial justice investment

(New York, NY) – Today, Google.org announced its $5 million grant to the Center For Policing Equity (CPE) to advance CPE’s National Justice Database (NJD), the country’s first database to track and standardize police stops, use of force, and other community interaction data across law enforcement agencies nationwide.

The grant was awarded by the philanthropic arm of Google and will be spread over the next three years. It will enable CPE to incorporate surveys of residents that directly link police behavior to community perceptions of police, to expand the NJD to more cities, and reduce reporting times back to police departments once analysis of their data is complete. As part of the partnership, Google will also help automate the process by which CPE extracts data from participating police departments.

“Google’s deep investment will help us think bigger and bolder about how to make policing more democratic and more American,” said CPE President and Co-Founder Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff. “It’s nothing short of a financial miracle in terms of what it allows us to do.”

Since 2015, Google.org has committed more than $5 million to nonprofits advancing racial justice,” Justin Steele, principal at Google, said. “Today, we’re doubling our commitment to include $11.5 million in new grants to racial justice innovators across the country working to reform our criminal justice system. We believe science can be part of the solution, which is why we’re investing in organizations using data and evidence to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system.”

Goff, along with Jack Glaser (UC Berkeley), Steve Raphael (UC Berkeley), and Amanda Geller (NYU), began building The National Justice Database in 2012. To date, departments responsible for more than one-half of the country’s major cities and representing more than one-third of the United States (by population) have committed to participate. The most recent NJD city report, prepared for the Austin (Texas) Police Department is available here.

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