All posts by Policing Equity Team

The Center for Policing Equity Partners with the Schott Foundation to Help End the School-to-Prison Pipeline in Florida

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 15, 2017

Contact:
Lauren E. Williams, lauren@policingequity.org
DeQuendre Neeley-Bertrand, db@schottfoundation.org

The Center for Policing Equity Partners with the Schott Foundation to Help End the School-to-Prison Pipeline in Florida

(New York, NY) – This month, the Schott Foundation for Public Education awarded the Center for Policing Equity (CPE) $795,000 to support its Policing and Discipline Equity Project (PDEP). The initiative collects and analyzes data to address school discipline practices in Florida’s Broward County Public Schools.

“Fairness in policing begins on day one. That’s what makes our work with Broward County so important,” said CPE’s President and Co-Founder Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff. “If we can help establish trust between school resource officers and our children, we decrease the likelihood of issues with law enforcement later in life. We can also use these data to call out injustice and reform school discipline policies. CPE’s goal is to promote equity throughout the lifespan. I thank the Schott Foundation for awarding us this grant, allowing us to further this urgent research.”

CPE began working on the PDEP with Broward County in 2016 in partnership with the Advancement Project. The PDEP aims to reduce racial disparities in suspensions, expulsions, and other disciplinary practices for students and to identify contributing factors to persistent discipline disparities and school arrests.

“Many advocates have taken to the media to call out the ‘school-to-prison pipeline’ and its devastating effects on communities, but few have asked why the pipeline is there in the first place and why some school leaders take the actions they do,” said Dr. R. Nicole Johnson-Ahorlu, director of CPE’s Juvenile Justice and Education initiative. “CPE has stepped in to answer these questions and provide the much-needed research to help school officials nationwide make better decisions for all our children.”

The PDEP involves surveys of students, teachers, and principals. Parents participate in focus groups, and researchers analyze multiple sets of data. CPE will use the findings of the study to:

1) inform the development of an implicit bias training for educators and school resource officers;
2) support the restructuring of hiring and training practices;
3) adjust the servicing of student and employee needs in schools; and
4) modify written policies to improve school discipline and school policing practices in Florida.

CPE’s grant aligns with the Schott Foundation’s mission to develop and strengthen a broad-based and representative movement to achieve fully resourced, quality PreK-12 public education. Schott supports multiple national campaigns that are fighting for systemic change in the disparities that poor children and children of color face in our nation’s schools.

“You can’t teach children who aren’t in school. Excessive suspensions reduce students’ instructional time and widens the opportunity gap,” said Schott’s President and CEO John H. Jackson. “We are encouraged by the leadership of CPE and other community partners in bringing discipline data to life and elevating the voices of those most affected by these policies.”

Click here to learn more about the Center for Policing Equity and the Policing and Discipline Equity Project.

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The Center for Policing Equity (CPE) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing some of the nation’s biggest social challenges through data and accountability. CPE works with police departments, communities, and political stakeholders to look for ways to strengthen relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

The Schott Foundation for Public Education aims to develop and strengthen a broad-based and representative movement to achieve fully resourced, quality PreK-12 public education. Schott’s core belief is that well-resourced grassroots campaigns can lead to systemic change in the disparities poor children and children of color face in our nation’s schools. In helping to build these campaigns into a movement, Schott recognizes its pivotal role as both funder and advocate to ensure that all children have an opportunity to learn.

Center for Policing Equity Director of Law Enforcement Engagement Statement on President Trump’s Ending of DACA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 6, 2017

CONTACT:
Lauren E. Williams
Lauren@policingequity.org

Center for Policing Equity Director of Law Enforcement Engagement Statement on President Trump’s Ending of DACA

NEW YORK, NY – Yesterday, Chief Chris Burbank, director of law enforcement engagement of the Center for Policing Equity and former chief of the Salt Lake City Police Department, released the following statement in response to President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program:

“As a nation we are at our best when humanity drives our decision making. Unfortunately, rhetoric, xenophobia and fear overruled reason today in the determination to end DACA.

“In my experience, derisive and exclusionary behavior has only served to increase crime and disorder. The open participation of all individuals in a community creates trust and ultimately safety.

“Today we stepped backwards, losing the trust and cooperation of 800,000 members of our community.”

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Acclaimed Law Professor Susan A. Bandes Joins the Center for Policing Equity

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 5, 2017

Media Contact:
Lauren E. Williams
Lauren@policingequity.org

Acclaimed Law Professor Susan A. Bandes Joins the Center for Policing Equity

NEW YORK, NY — Today, the Center for Policing Equity welcomed DePaul University Centennial Professor Emeritus Susan A. Bandes as a Distinguished Research Scholar.  Nationally renowned as a scholar in criminal procedure, civil rights, and the role of emotion in the law, Bandes will spearhead policy legal analyses.

“Susan Bandes brings a wealth of knowledge to CPE at a critical time. As we continue to expand our research efforts in evidence-based approaches to police accountability, Susan’s scholarly and policy expertise will continue to position CPE as a national leader in police reform. I look forward to sharing ideas and working with her,” said Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, president and co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity.

“The Center for Policing Equity uses data to empower our nation’s law enforcement, improve community and police relations, and promote accountability, transparency, and fairness in the law. I am pleased to join Dr. Goff and the CPE team and proud to become part of its research initiative.” said Bandes.

Bandes’ legal career began in 1976 at the Illinois Office of the State Appellate Defender. In 1980, she became staff counsel for the Illinois ACLU, where she litigated a broad spectrum of civil rights cases. She joined the DePaul faculty in 1984, and was named Centennial Professor in 2012. She has published more than seventy articles, which appear in law journals including the Yale, Stanford, University of Chicago, Michigan and Southern California law reviews, as well as interdisciplinary journals such as Law and Social Inquiry, the Annual Review of Law and Social Science, and the Law and Society Review. Her book The Passions of Law was published by NYU Press in 2000.

Bandes is a member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. She is cofounder of the Law and Society Association’s Collaborative Research Network on Law and Emotion. She received her B.A. from the State University of New York at Buffalo and J.D. from the University of Michigan.

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Center for Policing Equity Co-Founder Issues Statement on the Trump Administration’s Plan to Lift the Ban on Military Weapons Use By Law Enforcement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 28, 2017
CONTACT:
Lauren E. Williams
 
 
Center for Policing Equity Co-Founder Issues Statement on the Trump Administration’s Plan to Lift the Ban on Military Weapons Use By Law Enforcement
NEW YORK, NY – Today, Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, president and co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity, released the following statement in response to President Donald Trump’s new Executive Order to lift the ban on the use of military weapons by law enforcement:

“President Trump’s new Executive Order sends the wrong message to communities across America.

“Thoughtful engagement and mutual respect are the core elements in creating and nurturing trust between communities and law enforcement. History has shown us this, and 2014’s unfortunate events in Ferguson underscored this truth: public trust cannot exist where the public feels besieged by an army.

“Police officers must have the right tools and resources to keep communities safe, but these resources shouldn’t be supplied at the expense of critical partnerships. When they are, these actions can alienate members of law enforcement and communities, possibly reversing social progress we’ve worked so hard to achieve.

“While evidence is mixed on how the use of military equipment influences police behavior, we do know that trust is not built through force. Public safety works best when it is built on a foundation of trust. As a nation, we should work to strengthen that trust – not weaken or destroy it.”

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Center for Policing Equity Co-Founder Issues Statement in Response to  President Trump’s Policing Remarks  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 28, 2017
 
CONTACT:
Safiya Jafari Simmons

Safiya@policingequity.org

Center for Policing Equity Co-Founder Issues Statement in Response to 
President Trump’s Policing Remarks  
NEW YORK, NY — Today, Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, president and co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity, released the following statement in response to President Trump’s remarks delivered today in New York:
“Today’s statement by President Trump encourages communities to be less trusting of police by supporting police injustice. By suggesting that police punish ‘bad guys’ before they have even been tried in court, the President’s address implied a disrespect for the rule of law. The police chiefs and officers I’ve spoken to are disgusted, by the President’s statements — and the applause.

“Unchecked police force is not tough. It is not ‘manly’ and it does not reduce crime.  What it does accomplish is to make crime victims less likely to call 911 for help because they fear how police will treat them. And when someone fears calling the police, it is not just a threat to their own safety, it is a threat to the safety of those they might otherwise have tried to help. If I am attacked on the street, I surely hope those who see it will feel safe calling the police to protect me. Today’s statements by the President are dangerous because they make that less likely.
“Punitive force by any member of law enforcement is potentially a precursor to violence against the next officer encountering that individual.  Excessive force dehumanizes all involved, both police and public.
‘The bottom line is this: We are all less safe when any of us does not trust the police. Police know this. We work hard with dedicated women and men in blue who commit their lives to earning the trust of neighborhoods long skeptical of police power. And with so many communities and law enforcement agencies trying so hard to improve trust and stem the tide of negative officer-involved incidents, the last thing anyone needs is their efforts being undermined by the nation’s Commander-in-Chief.”
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Center for Policing Equity Releases Statement on the Resignation of Minneapolis Police Chief Janee Harteau  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 21, 2017
 
CONTACT:
Safiya Jafari Simmons
Safiya@policingequity.org

 

Center for Policing Equity Releases Statement on the Resignation of Minneapolis Police Chief Janee Harteau  
NEW YORK, NY — Today, the Center for Policing Equity released the following statement on the resignation of Minneapolis Police Chief Janee Harteau:
“Having partnered with the Minneapolis Police Department for several years, we are hopeful that Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges’ request for the resignation of Police Chief Janee Harteau is accompanied by a deepening commitment to the reforms already begun in the department.
“This course correction should include an acceleration of some of the changes that were already in place: improvement in data collection; training on implicit bias; and analytics that target solutions for racial disparities in policing.
“Unexpected changes are inevitable in the pursuit of reform.  Minneapolis is one of the cities in the National Initiative to Build Community Trust and Justice, and as a result, one of the cities in our National Justice Database.  It was the face of police reform in Minnesota, and announcements like this often have the unintended consequence of slowing progress.
“We hope this development does not become a setback for the values of equality, justice, and science-based reform that Minneapolis has moved to embrace.”
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The presidency minus personal responsibility

A study released last month from the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality found that black girls as young as age 5 are viewed as more knowledgeable about sex than their White peers, less innocent, and less in need of protection. Black boys have until the age of 10 before they lose the assumption of childhood innocence. A 2014 study led by Prof. Phillip Atiba Goff, now of John Jay College, found that black boys are perceived to be roughly 4.5 years older than they actually are. That means that by 13, they’re assigned the same culpability as a legal adult. Read More

There’s a predictable pattern to a fatal police shooting. But not in the case of Justine Ruszczyk

(CNN)
Why the reaction is different this time –
David Love, a Philadelphia journalist who’s written about race issues for CNN and others, has a theory why.
We haven’t reckoned with our history so it shouldn’t surprise us to see a different reaction – Phillip Atiba Goff  Read more